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Jeff Almen

|Jeff Almen
Jeff Almen

About Jeff Almen

Jeff Almen is Manager of National Business Relations for NISC. He has worked in communications, marketing and business development capacities for national rural utility and rural electric systems for 28 years, first with the electric co-op bank CFC, and then for the National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative (NRTC), the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, and now NISC. In his career, he has supported the technology development of both independent telephone systems and rural electric cooperatives for consumer and internal applications. He is a native of Wisconsin and Minnesota and lives in Herndon, VA.

Utility Broadband Directors Conference 2018

Utility broadband is an important topic in the industry, and questions surrounding the rollout and adoption, among other aspects of the technology, are at the forefront of many minds in the utility industry. Maybe none more so than the Boards of Directors at utility cooperatives across the country.

By | May 9th, 2018|Blog|Comments Off on Utility Broadband Directors Conference 2018

This New Gizmo Will Catch Your Eye

Daily, new devices roll out of the “gizmosphere,” hyped with promises big and small.  More often than not, they elicit a “seen-that-done-that,” or “Are they crazy,” reaction. That’s how I felt about Google Glass, the spectacles that promise a usable and wearable network connection.  I ho-hummed the latest Google thing until I watched the Google video and read that the big daddy of Internet newspaper sites, The New York Times, has release a headline app for the device. While most of us will let the hipsters and the tech crowd pay up to $1500 per pair when they hit the market in 2014, the Google Glass functionality should not be overlooked.  Unlike recent Google product splashes, like the now deceased Wave, this is a concept we can all quickly understand. By placing a smart, Bluetooth/wi-fi data transceiver and battery into the temple of the glasses, and a small 640 x 360 display on the upper corner of the glasses frame, Google is launching a new form factor for internet and connected access. Google Glass is voice and temple-touch controlled.  It takes pictures, videos, will send and receive images and short messages.  The first announced Glass app, The New York Times headlines, will deliver headlines. If Glass catches on, it will deliver most of the content and services you now get over a smart phone. And if you’re not a big Google fan, other tech companies have announced their intention of competing with “Google Glass” in this new hardware area.  Your space-on-the-face may be the next are of high tech competition. As I watched the video, it struck me that this is a product that would find a home in the rural utility and rural telecom work.  It [...]

By | May 13th, 2013|Blog|0 Comments